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@joeyh
Re: %HvhfckSP7

crockpotexposed.JPG

No internal insulation besides dead air, no thermostat. Not even any electrical insulation that I can see, although there must be something inside that heating element.

@joeyh
Re: %HvhfckSP7

(Also a good excuse to visit my favorite "beach" in the river.)

@joeyh
Re: %HvhfckSP7

Standard fibreglass insulation could be used, as long as the heat stays below its melting point of 1000F. But I dunno about outgassing etc when it's heated.

Maybe just put it inside a box and fill with sand? Only 1/6th the R value, but easy. Heading in the direction of a thermal mass stove..

@bob
Re: %HvhfckSP7

@󠁪󠁯󠁥󠁹Joey Hess
I am not clear whether our crockpot has some form of internal thermostat, or is simply limited by the resistance of the elements at different settings. (I have not noticed it 'ticking' in use, which you would expect with the cycling of a mechanical thermostat.)

Regardless, the crockpots we have here have no thermal insulation, beyond the air gap between outer and (removable) inner, and I suspect could be run much more efficiently if insulation were added.

Since only the inner is routinely washed, it should be a simple matter to insulate the outer.
As for the lid, I routinely place a teatowel over it, remembering that all you are trying to do is inhibit airflow.

I believe these measures would greatly reduce power consumption once the load was up to temperature.

Correction: the outer on our new crockpot does have a double skin (the old one didn't). It seems likely that most of the heat loss is through the lid, and so easily reduced.
DSCF1718.JPG

@joeyh
Re: %HvhfckSP7

Yeah, unless there's a way to make an electric pressure cooker default to on, and turn off when it gets too pressurised, I'm not messing with those.

Found an inexpensive thermal cooker with a 35 watt 12V heating element. Amazon
Only heats to 90C though. Wonder what would happen if it were fed 24V?

@nanomonkey
Re: %HvhfckSP7

Electric pressure cookers are usually well insulated, and relatively efficient. Unfortunately they don't just turn on when you give them power, they need to be physically programmed for a task. It would be nice if there were an open api that where the appliance could be told what to do by your battery charge controller or home automation system. Of course, as long as security concerns were baked in...don't want anyone spinning up my centrifuges to dangerous speeds because they're on a insecure scada controller.

@nanomonkey
Voted With the relays installed, I have the crockpot automated. It runs when the
@Aran
Voted With the relays installed, I have the crockpot automated. It runs when the
@Aran
Voted Messing around with a crock pot as a resistive load irradiance sensor. It u

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